Gackt’s Cats Used To Be So Innocent…

~Revisiting “Koakuma Heaven,” January 7, 2010~

Note: The original, older post & updates remain intact below this preface that’s written in blue. But, the interpretation written in blue is the latest understanding, whereas the original post includes lots of conjectures.

It’s been nearly a year since I put this translation up.  From the beginning, I understood that the song was being sung from the point of view of a woman, and got the impression that the woman was a prostitute.  Once Japanese fans who blog in English started weighing in, well, at least according to one (Mic at her blog Sugar & Spice & Everthin’ Nice), the song was indeed from the point of view of a “whore.” Later, it came to light that there was a magazine called “Koakuma Ageha,” which is targeted at girls and women who prefer a certain style (which, I gather, looks like what GACKT and the models on the cover of the “Koakuma Heaven” single are wearing).

Now, from the comments people have left on this blog, as well as discussions at other predominantly English-language fanblogs, I see that there is disagreement as to whether we should take the girl as a “prostitute.”  Some say the girl is just a hostess, a woman paid to chat and flirt with men, but no more.  Some say it’s not supposed to be all that sexual.

Okay, so the girl in the song is just a hostess.  But from my understanding, while hostesses are forbidden from outright prostituting themselves, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t go on in a few cases.  So, which did GACKT intend?  I don’t know if he’s ever said outright, this song is about a hostess who does not sell sexual services. Frankly, I don’t think that matters all that much. Whether she’s a hostess or a prostitute, she’s selling her services (much the same way that anyone who is employed sells themselves).

As for the song not being sexual, I have to disagree on the basis of what GACKT wrote in English and the simpler Japanese alone.  “With wet lips up and down,” “the numbers I like are 6 and 9,” I mean, short of straight out saying “I’m singing about various sex acts,” the song is sexual.  And, it’s full of double-entendres.  Which pair of “lips” is he talking about?  Again, has GACKT ever said straight out which he intended?  I think he intended for it to be sexual, knowing full well multiple interpretations were possible from what he wrote.

Given more recent comments, I’ve made a few tweaks to the translation.  Overall, I’m 99.9% sure that I got the overarching concept of the song right, and that concept is: the song is sung by a woman who in one way or another is selling herself, and she’s talking about what she does. I’m 80% sure that she is trying hard to convince herself that what she does is okay, but that she doesn’t really think so.

Okay, below, in black, is the original post, and a tweaked translation, with an added note about why I translated 小股者 the way I did.

~~~

If you’re a Gackt fan, you probably know that for whatever reason, live performances of “U + K” from his album MARS feature a bunch of people dancing around in cat costumes on stage. Recently on Gackt’s official Japanese site you can see a clip of a cat dancing to a dance/house style song. For me it’s nigh impossible to understand the robotic voice, but recently the lyrics were posted under “Preparation for the LIVE.” You can see the lyrics on the official site here, but since the kanji are pretty hard to read (because it’s a picture, not text) I typed the lyrics below (increase the text size of your browser to see them more easily, should that be of interest to you).

You don’t even need to be able to read Japanese to see where this is going! (Though I did romanize and translate it below.) How different from the childlike innocence of “U + K”, where these dancing cats first appeared! “Dispar” was pretty perverted, but this is on a whole new level!

The “character” in this song, or the one “speaking,” is a woman. You can tell by the use of the sentence-final particle わ (wa) and the pronoun ウチ (uchi), which is predominantly used by women and children (and I should hope this isn’t a child talking!) But who is she? A girlfriend? A succubus? A hostess? I’m not entirely sure what her role is. And considering this is part of the Rebirth universe, what with its androids, I bet the action of the song is occurring online in some sort of cyber reality, explaining all the emoticons.

(Sorry the verses are all jammed together, I’m having trouble making them align correctly because of the text wrapping.)

小悪魔ヘヴン

巻き髪をかき上げて☆

濡れたリップで Up and Down ★

欲張りッしュに3回戦、4回戦、5回戦...

オシャベリわ 上級者な ѡ デス (*^◻^*)

愛情の欠落わ サイフの厚みで

ガマンしてま〜すゥ m( _ _ )m

恋をするのも 気楽ぢゃないんで

玩張ってま〜すゥ ハイッ(ー_ー#)

ナニが何でも玩張るウチらわ

いいオンナ...なんデス、ハイッ♪

ブチアゲな 曲に合わせ ☆

濡れたヒップを Upside Down ★

好きなナンバーわ6(*• д •)9

ハイッ、脳脳脳脳天気...なんデス \(^o^)/

サイコーな決めポーズで

「本命のカレシ!? wow、性してますゥ !!(^−^)!!」

(ホンだヨ)

イヤになるほどキライぢゃないんで

小股者デス、ハイッ(ー◻ー;)

ナニを何度も玩張るウチらわ

いいオンナ...なんデス、ハイッ♪

恋をするのも気楽ぢゃないんで

玩張ってま〜すゥ、ハイッ v(^-^)v

ナニが駄目でも玩張るウチらわ

いいオンナ...(デショ?)

濃い〜のするのも若くはないんで

玩張ッてま〜すゥ、ハイッ(ー◻ー;)!!

ナニが誰のでも玩張るウチらわ

いいオンナ...なんデス、ハイッ♪

koakuma hevun

makigami wo kakiagete

nureta rippu de Up and Down

yokuburisshu ni (three four five) sankaisen, yonkaisen, gokaisen… [see translation notes below]

OSHABERI wa joukyuusha DESU

aijou no ketsuraku wa SAIFU no atsumi de

GAMAN shitema~suU

koi suru mo kiraku ja nain da

ganbattema~suU HAI

NANI ga nan de mo ganbaru UCHI ra

ii ONNA…nan DESU, HAI

BUCHIAGEna kyoku ni awase

nureta hippu wo Upside Down

sukina nanbaa wa (six and nine) 69 [see translation notes below]

HAI, nou nou nou nou tenki…nan DESU

saiko na kime poozu de

“honmei no KARESHI!? wow, sagashitemasuU”

(HONTO da YO)

IYA ni naru hodo KIRAI ja nain de

komatasha DESU, HAI

NANI wo nan do mo ganbaru UCHIra wa

ii ONNA…nan DESU, HAI

koi wo suru no mo kiraku ja nain de

ganbattema~suU, HAI

NANI ga dame de mo ganbaru UCHIra wa

ii ONNA…(desho?)

koi~no suru no mo wakakunain de

ganbattema~suU, HAI

NANI ga dare no de mo ganbaru UCHIra wa

ii ONNA…nan DESU, HAI

___________________________________

I suppose emoticons are a natural progression for Gackt, who frequently uses odd kanji switches to make double entendres and once used the ♂ and ♀ symbols to correspond to the sung lyrics “angels” and “gods,” respectively. Alright, so here’s my translation of this song, with translation notes at the end marked with [ ]. But note: I am NOT a native Japanese speaker so I’m sure there’s lots of puns and such that I may not even be aware of.

Little Devil Heaven

Running my fingers through your curly hair

With wet lips Up and Down

Greedily, a third round, a fourth, a fifth… [1]

I’m a great conversationlist (*^◻^*)

Lack of affection can be ENDURED

According to the thickness of one’s WALLET m(_ _)m

It’s not easy even if one is in love

I will do my best, YES (-_-#) [2]

WE who do our best through ANYTHING

ARE good WOMEN… YES

In time to the surging melody

Turn the wet hips Upside Down

The numbers I like are 6 and (*• д •)9 [3]

YES, it IS c-c-c-c-carefree abandon [4]

In our set pose,

“A real BOYFRIEND!? I’m searching !!(^_^)!!” [5]

(HEY, it’s TRUE)

I don’t DISLIKE it to the point I find it LOATHSOME,

I AM a woman with a nice body, YES (-◻-;) [6]

WE who do our best time and again

ARE good WOMEN… YES

It’s not easy even if one is in love

I’ll do my best, YES v(^-^)v

Even if SOMETHING is bad, WE who do our best are

Good WOMEN…(RIGHT?)

Even if it’s a deep love, because I’m not young

I will do my best, YES (-◻-;)!!

Even if SOMETHING belongs to someone, WE who do our best

ARE good WOMEN…YES

_____________________________________________

Notes:

[1] He doesn’t actually sing the 回戦 “kaisen,” which is a counter for rounds (of a sports match or game). Instead, he actually says “three, four, five” in English.

[2] The kanji written here for “ganbaru,” to do one’s best, isn’t the usual one. As Gackt chose to write it, 玩張る rather than 頑張る, there is an implication of teasing or taunting.

[3] Gackt sings “six and nine,” not just “six nine” or “sixty nine.”

[4] This one’s a doozy. The word “noutenki,” meaning carefree abandon is usually written 能天気. But Gackt used 脳, which means “brain,” instead of 能, and what’s more, repeated it four times. So, is it carefree abandon in the realm of one’s mind, or…someone is giving/getting really good “brain.” (It’s the latter, in case you hadn’t noticed where this song is “going,” lol.)

[5] Gackt wrote “sagasu,” meaning “to look/search for”, with 性 , a kanji that can be pronounced as “saga”, but usually not in that word and not with that meaning. On its own, that kanji means “sex; gender; nature.”

[6] The phrase 「小股が切れ上がる」is used to refer to “a smart and slenderly shaped woman,” according to Jim Breen’s WWWJDIC.  That’s why I translated 小股者 as “I am a woman with a nice body.”  I understand the feeling of this line and the preceding line as, “I don’t really like my job, but I’ve got the looks for it so why not?”

UPDATE: According to Japanese blogger Mic, this song is about a whore, which is what I suspected given the line about the wallet. Now it really makes sense. See her post here (you have to enter a password though, as specified).

UPDATE (JUNE 5, 2009): Gackt performed this song on Music Station, so I could finally hear what he sung some parts as that were a bit strange and fixed them. See the performanceOr better yet (AKA UPDATE June 7), scroll down to see it in the comments.  Ntkufreak used this translation and romanization to do a subtitled vid! Thanks for that! (A little later)…and the vid’s been taken down.

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13 thoughts on “Gackt’s Cats Used To Be So Innocent…

  1. Hello–

    I really like your explanation and especially your translation, it is very well done. I am currently subtitling the Koakuma live and would like to use your translations — I can credit you in the video file itself and in the YouTube comment if you would like, however you would like, or if you are not comfortable with it, use someone else’s translations entirely.

    If you’d like a link to the YouTube video I can provide as soon as it’s uploaded.

    Thank you again for your hard work and I hope that you do not mind this~

    • Hello and welcome, Ntkufreak!

      I sent you an email, but just in case, I’ll answer here also.

      I don’t mind if you use my translation, with only two conditions: 1. add a disclaimer that the translator is not a native Japanese speaker, and 2. give credit by linking back to Scales of Libra. Surely you’ve seen the translation on amaiakuyume’s Live Journal, and it differs in substantial ways from mine. That’s why I think the disclaimer is important.

      It would be nice if you could drop by and post a link to the vid once it’s subtitled. Thanks for your work doing that! (From what little experience I have doing subtitles, I know it’s not the funnest thing in the world!)

      • No worries. Thanks so much, and I did receive your email. 🙂

        Hahaha – I really enjoy doing subs, but yeah, it can be quite tedious 😉 But it’s so much fun to watch when they’re done!

        Here you are —

        Thank you again for letting me use your hard work! ❤

  2. Pingback: syunikiss.org » Gackt reaches for some kind of heaven

  3. 最強の顏文字!!!!~

    e首歌好正(d歌詞),
    超多顏文字..
    可惜我吾多睇得明日文-3-!!
    只系識少少~~~`!
    英文也廢廢的說>3<!

    • 儀.., thanks for stopping by! Xie xie! Unfortunately for me, I can’t read Chinese.

      From what I know of kanji via Japanese, the first line says something like “Strongest writing”??

  4. this song is actually about “アゲハ”, a type of girls who dress up like a princess, and try too hard to look ultra pretty, to the point of being a whore, becoz — that’s right — fishing for guys is their intention. gackt said on a recent tv show that he started writing this song from a guy’s perspective, but he rewrote it later becoz he found it more fun this way. have ya learned the dance moves already?? 🙂

    • Thanks for stopping by, Kalmia!

      Yes, now that the video is out it’s easier to understand that GACKT was mocking the girls of “Ageha Heaven” specifically, but back in January what did we know? Anyway, since he’s talking about those that prostitute themselves, I feel no need to change my translation or add more notes than it already has.

      Lol, I haven’t learned the moves. The video was pulled before I could. >_<

  5. Oh, I don’t know how to write this without making you misunderstanding, but I strongly recommened you to go through the lyrics again with a native japanese, who knows the Kyaba mileu and Gackt.
    I am sorry, but you getting it totally wrong from the beginning.

    巻き髪をかき上げて☆ – “Running my fingers through your curly hair ☆” ????

    It just says ”Having an curly up-done hair-style”!

    And
    “オシャベリわ 上級者な ѡ デス”
    – “Go on and talk, I AM an advanced learner ”

    TOTALLY WRONG! It says the speaker is a skillful talker, as all Hostess have to be if they want to be good in the business.
    Anyway, please, please go trough the lyrics again with a native speaker….who knows the mileu. 😦

    • Hello, miraclecandy! Thanks for your comment!

      Unfortunately, the only native Japanese I have access to are my coworkers and professors, neither or which I’d feel comfortable discussing these lyrics with. Even if the song isn’t as dirty as I think it is, it’s not clean either. What GACKT wrote in English makes that clear enough. Even if the girl in the song is just flirting because it’s her job to do so, it’s still not something I can go up to my coworkers and professors asking about. (i.e.: 先生、すみません、「濡れたリップで Up and Down ★」はどういう意味ですか。That’s a little 恥ずかしい, don’t you think? ^o^) So, may I ask you about what you pointed out? You didn’t say whether you were a native Japanese speaker or not, but even if you aren’t I’d like to understand all of your comment.

      Yeah, I see now that I translated オシャベリわ 上級者な ѡ デス wrong; I was taking the わ as the feminine sentence-final particle rather than the topic marker は. I will fix it. Thank you!

      As for 巻き髪をかき上げて, I translated it that way because according to the dictionary 「英辞郎 on the WEB」over at Space ALC (http://www.alc.co.jp/), 巻き髪 can mean either “bun” (a done-up hairstyle) or “curly,” and, the all the results for かき上げる were either about running one’s finger’s through one’s hair, brushing one’s hair out of one’s face, or otherwise putting one’s hands in one’s hair. It’s hard to run one’s fingers through a bun, so I translated it as “running my fingers through your curly hair.” So, is it not possible that GACKT meant this as a double-entendre (double-entendre = 両義語句)?

      As for “kyaba mileu,” do you mean “cabaret milieu,” as in, “the people that frequent cabarets” or “the social environment of cabarets”? Or just, キャバ嬢?

      Lastly, you said I had it “totally wrong from the beginning.” Do you mean there are massive errors all over the place, or that I happened to have an error at the beginning? Usually, the English phrase “from the beginning” implies that everything that follows is also the same as whatever preceded the “from the beginning.” There are other things I translated that I’m not sure about, but I don’t see how the whole entire translation is wrong.

      Well, if you have time to reply, I thank you in advance, and if not, I understand. Thanks again for your comment! m(_ _)m

  6. First of all I would like to thank you for you reply. I am really relieved, because you seem an ambitious person, who wants to improve her own skills.
    I am neither a native english nor a native japanese speaker.
    I think it is very brave of you, to try the translation of such a difficult text.

    Of course this song is nothing you feel to discuss with somebody you are not comfortable with.

    Not only the knowlege of the japanese language is neccesary, but also a lot of background information, to get the real meaning of the lyrics.
    I once saw a japanese on Yahoo 知恵袋 (Yahoo Answers) asking what the ’69’ in the song would mean, so as you see, even for japanese it might be hard.

    I saw your enty when asking in a community, why the song has not been introduced in Ageha. Someone answered me “the song is basically about how gyaru girls are whores, so that’s probably why ageha does not write about it.” and referred to your blog.

    I was really shoked, because the song did not gave me the impression of talking bad of the gyaru girls.

    With the “kyaba mileu” I meant キャバクラ, which is short for キャバレークラブ, but basically it is only used in its’ abbreviated form. I assume, you do not know much about it? It reffers to the hostess clubs. These clubs have, however, abroad many different images, the worst are saying that hostesses are prostitues, which is the same bad false assertion as saying geishas are ones.

    I can’t give you a detailed explanation about the Hostess Club, but the english Wikipedia entry does explain it quite well. You might also have a look at the japanese entry.
    So these girls working there are called Kyaba-jo,
    Girls, interested in Hime-kei fashion are called Hime-Gyaru or Age-jo.

    Yes, with “totally wrong from the beginning.” I meant it as I said, because during the whole translation are lots of mistakes, which are just due to misintepretation, or mistranslation.

    About my background: I have studied japanology and after that lived in Japan for more than four years now.
    I am very interested in Hime-Gyaru and it’s fashion, and just recently I became a big fan of Gackt. I knew him since he was with Malice Mizer, but I have never taken a closer look on him.
    I was very curious about him having the song KOAKUMA HEAVEN, and have tried to find out as much as possible.

    I saw the new blue entry in your blog. The magazine, you were reffering to is called KOAKUMA AGEHA. It is a mook (magazine and book), which is concentrating on Hime-Gyaru and Kyaba-Girls. Hime-Gyaru is a fashion style from Gyaru, having the ideal to look like a doll, being more elegant, more princessy and having not so dark tanned skin. The kyaba-girls look is mainly just the outfits worn at work, which are long evening-dresses, plus the hair and make-up from Hime-Gyaru.

    Trying to make it short, the main job of a hostess is as in the wikipedia entry stated, as follows:

    Hostesses, … literally club girl, are generally hired for their looks and/or personality. Hostesses light cigarettes, pour drinks, offer flirtatious conversation, and sing karaoke in an effort to keep the customers entertained.

    The discussion can be neverending, but SEX is not a part of it. Being sexy and interesting is on the contrary, one of the most important things, due to the fact, that it is the only way making the customer coming back.

    That is why in the hostesses’ profiles on the webpages of the clubs besides the regular information, there is often even the cup-size written. And that is also the reason, why it is an unwritten rule, to have a dress with a cleavage.
    Having once talked to a former host, a hostess, who had sex with a customer is not only a bad reputation but also making the customer not coming back, therefore a loss for the club.

    So back to the song: of course it is meant to be sexy, but unfortunately you misunderstood many parts of the song. You understood right, that the song is written from the point of view of an hostess, a kyabajo. Gackt has in an interview stated, that he has a friend, who has been very much into Kyabakura. So he dedicated a song to him, writing from the point of view of a Kyabajo. This song does not put Gackt into a low level artist, it is just meant to be a fun song, not to harm anybody. He had a one-month countdown to celebrate his 10-year anniversary as a solo artist, and being under time pressure, he decided to release two fun songs and two serious songs. (source: Gackt interview)
    Gackt Interview Part2Added to
    Quicklist9:16
    Gackt Interview Part2

    He also says in that song, that the lyrics are on purpose written in gyaru-language. So your comment does not apply:
    >>I suppose emoticons are a natural progression for Gackt, who frequently uses odd kanji switches to make double entendres<>makigami wo kakiagete
    This is not someone doing, but the person herself.
    And its more like the action, when you put one strand of hair behind your ear, or away from the face.

    >>nureta rippu de Up and Down
    this might reffer to the lippressing, once there is lipstick on it, to keep the colour, or of course playing sexily with them.

    >>yokuburisshu ni (three four five) sankaisen, yonkaisen, gokaisen…
    “Greedily” is okay, since the 3 kaisen, 4 kaisen, as you stated right, is usually meant as round 1 etc. in a match, but here it means the drinking round, as the Hostess is drinking more with, of course, than against the customer.

    >>OSHABERI wa joukyuusha DESU
    “I’m a great conversationlist” is okay

    >>aijou no ketsuraku wa SAIFU no atsumi de GAMAN shitema~suU

    thickness of one’s WALLET
    >>>>>>”my wallet” might be more appropriate.

    >>NANI ga nan de mo ganbaru UCHI ra
    >>ii ONNA…nan DESU, HAI
    Here the translation was okay.

    >>BUCHIAGEna kyoku ni awase
    “DON’T TALK, let’s join to the melody ”
    NO! ブチ (buchi) is more like 趙 (chou) and is stressing the following word, similar to “totemo”.
    And “age” is like “ageru”, which is here to get excited, so buchi age might be “getting really excited.”
    (“age” is used in many ways, similar to the english word “pimping”, but in the japanese you can pimp your hair, pimp the atmosphere, and so on. (There was once a hairstylist, who got all excited, saying age, age, many times, when styling the hair of a girl.))

    >>sukina nanbaa wa (six and nine) 69
    Yes, this reffers to 69 and the sexual position, but as I said, that just implies, that the Hostess is sexy, and more a koakuma, than a whore, prostitute, etc.

    >>HAI, nou nou nou nou tenki…nan DESU
    this is not meant negative and I don’t know if “carefree abandon” implies sth negative, but it’s more like a “carefree mind”
    >>saiko na kime poozu de (In our set pose)
    okay
    >>“honmei no KARESHI!? wow, sagashitemasuU”
    (“My favorite BOYFRIEND!? I’m searching !!(^_^)!!” [5])
    The footnote is right, but “honmei” means here more “certain” or “real”, as the Hostess needs to make the customer feel, he is the candidate for that position. The “My” in “My favorite” is better translated with a simple “a”…so “A real boyfriend? …”
    >>IYA ni naru hodo KIRAI ja nain de
    >>komatasha DESU, HAI
    (I don’t DISLIKE it to the point I find it LOATHSOME,
    I AM a woman with a nice body, YES (-◻-;) [6])
    This, we could not figure out, your translation might be a good possibilty. My boyfriend said, it is very strange, and not correct japanese.
    >>koi wo suru no mo kiraku ja nain de
    (It’s not easy even if one is in love)
    Here it might be better to say “It’s not easy to fall in love”.

    • I’ve taken the relevant paragraphs from your post and replied to them below. For the sake of clarity, I put your quotes in 「」.

      「I saw your enty when asking in a community, why the song has not been introduced in Ageha. Someone answered me “the song is basically about how gyaru girls are whores, so that’s probably why ageha does not write about it.” and referred to your blog.」

      I want to point out that I, myself, NEVER, EVER, said that gyaru girls are whores. There’s a BIG DIFFERENCE between saying “the character in this song is a hostess who may be prostituting herself” and “all gyaru girls are whores.” I NEVER said the latter statement. It’s not my fault if someone looked at my blog and chose to interpret it as “GACKT is saying that gyaru girls are whores.” I never said that! Even if GACKT did intend for the character in this song to be a gyaru who IS prostituting herself, I would never take that to mean that he thinks ALL gyaru are like that. Any statement that says ALL people are some way or another is a stereotype and therefore inherently wrong. I think part of the reason my translation my have irritated you is that you think I said such a thing, when, if you had read my post without having been referred to it by the person who did so, you wouldn’t have read it with a preconceived notion of what I was saying and would have taken it for what it is: a simple translation with no hidden agenda. I’m not out to defame GACKT nor gyaru. On the contrary, I’ve been a fan of GACKT for 6 years. In those six years, I repeatedly heard him say that he hates improper Japanese, and loves it when people speak in keigo. That’s why myself and many other fans were so surprised that he’d write a song with improper Japanese, and even gyaru moji! It’s precisely the sort of language that he said he hates.

      「I was really shoked, because the song did not gave me the impression of talking bad of the gyaru girls.」

      I don’t think he’s talking bad about all gyaru, just those like the one in the song.

      「With the “kyaba mileu” I meant キャバクラ, which is short for キャバレークラブ, but basically it is only used in its’ abbreviated form. I assume, you do not know much about it? It reffers to the hostess clubs. These clubs have, however, abroad many different images, the worst are saying that hostesses are prostitues, which is the same bad false assertion as saying geishas are ones.」

      While I am somewhat familiar with the 水商売 in general, I myself haven’t been to a host club; the closest I’ve come is a maid café. Again, I want to point out that I NEVER said that all gyaru or all hostesses are prostitutes. I understand how you’re offended by the conception many non-Japanese have of hostesses as prostitutes. I am similarly irritated by Westerners who say that all anime is either Pokémon or porn. However, the fact that most hostesses are not prostitutes does NOT negate the fact that some hostesses, even though they are not SUPPOSED to have sex with their clients, DO IT ANYWAY. Both the Wikipedia article you linked to, and an article in The Guardian that is used as reference in the Wikipedia article, say as much. (Quote from the Guardian article: “Officially, it is not part of the service, but it is no secret that hosts end up in bed with customers, although many try not to.”) To go back to my example: while it is most certainly false that all anime is either Pokémon or porn, I can’t deny that a large portion of all the anime produced is pornographic, and of the part that isn’t porn, a lot of it does have a premise very similar to that of Pokémon. One fact does not negate the other. So, I reiterate that I never said that all hostesses are prostitutes.

      「About my background: I have studied japanology and after that lived in Japan for more than four years now.
      I am very interested in Hime-Gyaru and it’s fashion, and just recently I became a big fan of Gackt. I knew him since he was with Malice Mizer, but I have never taken a closer look on him.
      I was very curious about him having the song KOAKUMA HEAVEN, and have tried to find out as much as possible.」

      I think that as someone who posted a translation, it’s fair to give a deeper background on myself than that in the “About this Blog” section. I studied Japanese formally for a total of four years, and continue my study now, though not through a university. I’m in Japan as an English teacher, not a student. I hold a Bachelor’s in Asian Studies concentrating in Japan. Granted, gyaru came up in my courses very little. I’ve been a GACKT fan for six years. I’ve followed his work closely. At first, since I didn’t know enough Japanese, it was only through the work of fans who blogged in English or Spanish that I stayed up-to-date on GACKT’s activities. Given that initial lack of Japanese ability, I can’t say I’m familiar with every last thing GACKT has ever said, but I am more familiar with him than a casual fan. I’m enough of a fan to bother writing his name in all-caps ever since he changed it, after all. ^o^ Honestly, when in your first comment you suggested I learn more about GACKT, I thought it was a little strange, because even if my translation is wrong, nothing I wrote is out of line with the kinds of things GACKT has been doing over the past six years. GACKT is no saint, and he makes no claims to being one.

      「I saw the new blue entry in your blog. The magazine, you were reffering to is called KOAKUMA AGEHA.」

      I will fix the magazine title, thanks!

      「Having once talked to a former host, a hostess, who had sex with a customer is not only a bad reputation but also making the customer not coming back, therefore a loss for the club.」

      Again, yes, the hostess shouldn’t sleep with a client, but again, at seedier places it happens. Heck, right here you’re talking of an instance where it happened, right?!

      「This song does not put Gackt into a low level artist, it is just meant to be a fun song, not to harm anybody.」

      NOWHERE DID I SAY THAT GACKT WAS A LOW LEVEL ARTIST OUT TO HARM PEOPLE WITH THIS SONG. Just because someone writes a dirty song, that doesn’t make them an inferior artist in my eyes. People have sex, so what? It’s a part of life. Some people pay for sex, so what? And some people write songs about people who partake in the mizu shoubai, so what? You may have read people on other sites slamming GACKT for making this song, but I never did.

      「He also says in that song, that the lyrics are on purpose written in gyaru-language. So your comment does not apply:
      >>I suppose emoticons are a natural progression for Gackt, who frequently uses odd kanji switches to make double entendres<」

      I’d like to point out that the sentence begins with “I suppose,” meaning it is conjecture on my part. In either case, that the lyrics are written in gyaru-language does not negate the opinion that emoticons could be seen as a natural progression from kanji switches; both techniques use symbols for expression rather than simple text.

      「>makigami wo kakiagete
      This is not someone doing, but the person herself.
      And its more like the action, when you put one strand of hair behind your ear, or away from the face.」

      Interestingly, this is different from what you first posted, and pretty much says what I wrote initially. There’s not that big a difference between running one’s fingers through one’s hair, and using one’s hand to move hair away from one’s face. The only point on which I may be mistaken is that I see it as the girl running her fingers through the man’s hair, whereas I think you’re saying she’s running her fingers through her own hair. I think GACKT meant for this to be taken either way. The ease with which this becomes a double-entendre is too great to ignore.

      「>>nureta rippu de Up and Down
      this might reffer to the lippressing, once there is lipstick on it, to keep the colour, or of course playing sexily with them.」

      Again, this is just TOO MUCH of a double-entendre to ignore. Actually, it can even be a triple-entendre! This sentence literally says, “With wet lips Up and Down.” You can’t deny that, and I’m 99% sure I know enough Japanese to get at least that much. It doesn’t matter whether you choose to interpret it as either a.) the girl moving the lips on her mouth in a sexy way while talking, or b.) the girl moving the lips of her mouth up and down while performing fellatio, or c.) the girl moving up and down while having vaginal sex – “lips” being a common way to refer to “labia,” since that’s what “labia” means anyway. Maybe GACKT didn’t mean for us to take it as “the characters in the song are having sex at the moment,” but come on, you can’t deny that he wrote the lyrics in a way that makes that possibility incredibly hard to ignore. Anyone who does deny it is just being puritanical and should not be listening to the music of a man who calls his own penis “Magnum.”

      「>>yokuburisshu ni (three four five) sankaisen, yonkaisen, gokaisen…
      “Greedily” is okay, since the 3 kaisen, 4 kaisen, as you stated right, is usually meant as round 1 etc. in a match, but here it means the drinking round, as the Hostess is drinking more with, of course, than against the customer.」

      Ah, I hadn’t thought about it as a round of drinks. That makes sense. However, I think this too is a double-entendre referring to fellatio, otherwise “greedily” doesn’t make much sense unless it means the hostess is making the client drink more and more because she greedily wants him to spend more money and thereby make more money herself.

      「thickness of one’s WALLET
      >>>>>>”my wallet” might be more appropriate.」

      I think we can take it either way. The client doesn’t have real affection in his life, so he goes to the hostess club and pays for affection. And maybe the hostess doesn’t have real affection in her life, so she uses the money she makes to feel happy. But honestly, given the previous line, it sounds to me like she’s mockingly telling the client why he should spend his money there. I.e., “I’m a great conversationalist, you can endure the lack of affection [by paying me] according to how much you’ve got in your wallet.”

      「NO! ブチ (buchi) is more like 趙 (chou) and is stressing the following word, similar to “totemo”.
      And “age” is like “ageru”, which is here to get excited, so buchi age might be “getting really excited.”
      (“age” is used in many ways, similar to the english word “pimping”, but in the japanese you can pimp your hair, pimp the atmosphere, and so on. (There was once a hairstylist, who got all excited, saying age, age, many times, when styling the hair of a girl.))」

      Oh, I see! So buchiagena is meant to be a na-adjective. That makes more sense. So it’s “buchiagena kyoku,” meaning it’s a song that makes them get riled up or excited. I will fix this.

      「>>sukina nanbaa wa (six and nine) 69
      Yes, this reffers to 69 and the sexual position, but as I said, that just implies, that the Hostess is sexy, and more a koakuma, than a whore, prostitute, etc.」

      Given that the previous line is “nureta hippu wo Upside Down,” I find it extremely hard to believe he isn’t talking about an actual 69, but in any case, what this line says is simply “The numbers I like are 6 and 9.” That’s what “sukina nanbaa wa 6 9” means and again, unless I’ve been speaking simple Japanese all kinds of wrong, you can’t deny that. The hostess could just be coquettishly saying, “I like 69s.” You don’t have to be a prostitute to enjoy a 69.

      「>>HAI, nou nou nou nou tenki…nan DESU
      this is not meant negative and I don’t know if “carefree abandon” implies sth negative, but it’s more like a “carefree mind”」

      “Carefree abandon” isn’t negative, and is the translation that ALC’s Eijirou gave for 能天気 and simply means doing something with great gusto without paying attention to anything else. Given that you’ve been fairly bold with your critique (you yourself even said you were “agressive”), I will here likewise be bold and say that if you don’t know precisely what something says, you shouldn’t “correct” it. If you’re not sure about what “carefree abandon” means, how can you say it’s “carefree mind” instead? Just because “carefree mind” would be a plausible translation of 能天気, that doesn’t automatically mean that all other translations are wrong.

      In English, “brain” is a euphemism for fellatio. Sometimes GACKT translates dirty English directly into Japanese, such as with the phrase “just masturbation” to mean doing something only for yourself which he used on his blog a while ago. So, given that, and the fact that if nowhere else in this song the line about the 69 CLEARLY refers to a position in which both partners are engaged in oral sex, I think GACKT used the kanji for “brain” to further refer to fellatio, and that’s why I went with Eijirou’s translation of “carefree abandon.” He knows dirty English. I’m sure he knows about “getting brains.” Of course, it could also be the same in Japanese and I just don’t know it, but it’s definitely the case in English.

      「(“My favorite BOYFRIEND!? I’m searching !!(^_^)!!” [5])
      The footnote is right, but “honmei” means here more “certain” or “real”, as the Hostess needs to make the customer feel, he is the candidate for that position. The “My” in “My favorite” is better translated with a simple “a”…so “A real boyfriend? …”」

      Okay, I’ll change it to “a.”

      「>>koi wo suru no mo kiraku ja nain de
      (It’s not easy even if one is in love)
      Here it might be better to say “It’s not easy to fall in love”.」

      I don’t understand why that would be better; I think either way is fine. I was taking this verse as saying, “It’s not easy [to be intimate with someone] even if one is in love [so why be upset about it when you’re paying for it?],” that’s why I translated it the way I did.

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